Course Descriptions

(Note: All courses are worth three credit hours unless otherwise stated)

ENGL-0103 English Fundamentals (Institutional Credit Only)

(Fall and Spring) The basics of grammar, sentence structure, and paragraph development prerequisite to college level writing. Students who score 18 or less on the English section of the ACT (440 or less on the SAT) must successfully complete this course as a prerequisite to English Composition I (EN-101).

ENGL-1013 English Composition I

(Fall and Spring) (Prerequisite: EN-100 or a score of 19-26 on the ACT English section) Introduction to the principles of effective composition and the application to writing paragraphs and essays on topics related to personal experiences. Grammar and mechanics are taught in relation to writing.

ENGL-1023 English Composition II

(PREREQUISITE TO ALL LITERATURE COURSES)
(Fall and Spring)(Prerequisite: EN-101 or a score of 27 or higher on the ACT English section) Writing essays on topics drawn from expository essays and narratives. In addition, the learning and applying of methods of research to demonstrate skills in developing a thesis and supporting comprehension in reading, expression, and documentation.

ENGL-2103 British Literature I (Medieval to Renaissance)

(Fall only) The reading of literature from Britain (England and its colonies) from its beginnings through the seventeenth century. The course treats major authors and works in the social and historical context of their times and seeks to relate pertinent values, ideas, and world views expressed therein to theistic and biblical truth.

ENGL-2113 British Literature II (Restoration/Eighteenth Century to Contemporary)

(Spring only) The reading of literature from Britain (England and its colonies) from the eighteenth century to the present. The course treats major authors and works in the social and historical context of their times and seeks to relate pertinent values, ideas, and world views expressed therein to theistic and biblical truth.

ENGL-2203 American Literature I (Colonial to Civil War)

(Fall only) The reading of literature from America from its beginnings to the eighteenth century. The course treats major authors and works in the social and historical context of their times and seeks to relate pertinent values, ideas, and world views expressed therein to theistic and biblical truth.

ENGL-2213 American Literature II (Civil War to Contemporary)

(Spring only) The reading of literature from America from the eighteenth century to the present. The course treats major authors and works in the social and historical context of their times and seeks to relate pertinent values, ideas, and world views expressed therein to theistic and biblical truth.

ENGL-2303 World Literature I (Ancient to Renaissance)

(Fall only) The reading of literature from its beginnings through the seventeenth century. The course treats major authors and works in the social and historical context of their times and seeks to relate pertinent values, ideas, and world views expressed therein to theistic and biblical truth.

ENGL-2313 World Literature II (Enlightenment to Contemporary)

(Spring only) The reading of literature from the eighteenth century to the present. The course treats major authors and works in the social and historical context of their times and seeks to relate pertinent values, ideas, and world views expressed therein to theistic and biblical truth.

ENGL-3713 History of the English Language

(Fall only) A survey of the history of the English language, beginning with its Indo-European background, tracing the development of Old, Middle, and Modern English through major changes in vocabulary, sound, word formation and syntax.

ENGL-3033 Advanced Composition

(Fall Alternate Odd Years) The development and application of the skills of effective writing pertinent to expository and persuasive essays that exhibit logic, coherence, structural soundness, and the exactness in grammar and mechanics characteristic of competent thinking and writing.

ENGL-3013 Business and Technical Writing

(Fall only) This survey course provides an introduction to the skills necessary for fluent communication in the corporate sphere. The course highlights the emergence and growth of wireless communication technologies and internet tools, and discusses their integration into modern business practice. The role and creation of formal presentations is also addressed. Specific topics may include public speaking, visual media, public relations, interpersonal communications, internet communication, and organizational communications as they apply to corporate networks.

ENGL-3003 Creative Writing

(Spring only) (Prerequisite: EN-102) The discovery, discussion, and practice of the elusive but essential qualities that characterize imaginative and unique styles in poetry, essays, and short stories. Manuscripts are presented in class to be considered for constructive critical evaluation and comment by the instructor and students.

ENGL-3603 Children's Literature

(Fall Alternate Even Years) An introduction to children's literature. Enduring classics, distinguished contemporary works, and notable Christian writings for children are among some of the aspects that are studied. Characteristics of good literature, illustrations, and illustrators are also examined. (Cross listed with ED-311)

ENGL-3023 Advanced English Grammar

(Spring Alternate Even Years) A study of descriptive grammar in relation to structure and to the current usage of cultivated and educated minds.

ENGL-3533 Studies in Literature and Film

(Spring only) The course will examine films as valid literary art forms and will consider the narrative and cinematic implications of films as adaptations of print literature (novels, short stories, etc.).

ENGL-3703 Studies in Literary Criticism

(Fall only) (Prerequisite: EN-102) A survey of the foundations of literature by reading and studying critical essays about the nature, purpose, quality, and kind of literature, beginning with ancient examples and continuing to the present. Texts written by writers and critics from Homer to Sartre are studied.

ENGL-3613 Literature for Adolescents

(Spring Alternate Odd Years) An examination of the selections relevant to middle and high school level readings and discussions of ways to analyze and teach these selections.

ENGL-3503 Studies in Poetry

(Spring Alternate Odd Years) A study of the patterns and developments within poetry drawn from ancient through modern sources. Emphasis is on modern British and American poetry.

ENGL-3513 Studies in Drama

(Spring Alternate Even Years) The reading of plays representative of the great periods of drama, including Classical, Renaissance, and Modern. Emphasis is placed on modern works to discover the significant trends of thought and dramaturgy.

ENGL-3523 Studies in Fiction

(Fall Alternate Odd Years) (Prerequisite: EN-102) The reading of selected short stories and novels. Emphasis is placed on the modern era, with discussions on the development of fiction and its various styles and techniques.

ENGL-4303 Studies in Ethnic Literature

(Fall only) Advanced studies in literature representing the ethnic diversity of American or world literature from generic, historical, thematic, or theoretical perspectives not included in the regular curriculum. Topics may change from term to term.

ENGL-4103 Studies in British Literature

(Fall only) Advanced studies in British Literature from generic, historical, thematic, or theological perspectives not included in the regular curriculum. Topics may change from term to term.

ENGL-4203 Studies in American Literature

(Spring only) Advanced studies in American Literature from generic, historical, thematic, or theological perspectives not included in the regular curriculum. EX: Southern Literature, Topics may change from term to term.

ENGL-4403 Studies in Major Authors

(Spring only) Advanced studies of major and influential authors from various cultures and backgrounds not included in the regular curriculum. Authors may change from term to term.

ENGL-4513 Secondary School Methods - English

(As Needed) (Prerequisite: ED-449) Covers planning, teaching methods and techniques, and evaluation for prospective teachers of English in junior and senior high school. Includes twenty hours of field experience.

ENGL-4959/4969 Special Topics

(As needed) An in-depth study of any author, genre, or topic within the field of English that may not be offered through another course within the semester.

ENGL-4803 Senior Seminar

(As Needed) An in-depth study of a topic proposed by the students and approved by the department chair. The student will write a paper of 25-30 pages length to demonstrate competency in persuasive writing, research, and critical interpretation. The development, support, and presentation of the topic may serve as a capstone to his or her studies in English.

COMM 1003 Speech Communication 3

The principles and attitudes that are necessary for good communication in the Christian life. Through lectures, exercises and graded experiences, the student is exposed to several of the most common communication situations.

COMM 2153 Survey of Oral Interpretation

Philosophy, planning, teaching methods, current materials evaluations as applied to speech classes in junior and senior high school.

COMM 2163 Introduction to Communication Theory

 A survey of theories in the field of human communication. Consideration is given to theories that explain communication behavior between pairs of people, within groups, in organization and in societies.

COMM 2513 Gender and Media

 In this course we will look closely at the ways gender is communicated within various cultural and institutional settings, the multiple ways humans communicate within and across gender lines, and the relationships of the two.

COMM 2523 History of Print and Electronic Media

 The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the history of media and to the stakes of historical inquiry. Different media emerge within and against different social, economic, perceptual and semiotic conditions that are themselves specific to different historical movements. Only by thinking carefully about transitions and interactions among media and culture in the past can we hope to understand the pace, direction, and character of changes today. The course is roughly chronological, surveying early oral forms of media and ending with anticipations of a digital future. However, it is not a comprehensive survey of media through all time and space: with some exceptions, we will focus primarily on the interchange between media content, media technology, and American life over the past two centuries.

COMM 2533 Journalism

 Emphasizes the writing and reporting of news for print, broadcast, and online media. Introduction to newsroom structures and processes, news judgment and decision making.

COMM 2543 Mass Media and Popular Culture

The dramatic experience including styles of theatrical expression, dramatic literature and introductory performance skills.

COMM 3513 Topics in American Television

 This course considers the medium of television as being one that informs and is informed by American culture. Focus is given to the development of dominant cultural issues to which television both responds and offers direction.

COMM 3523 History of Radio

 This course examines the history of radio broadcasting from its beginning to the present, with emphasis on cultural, technological, and economic backgrounds. Current media structures and policies will be placed in historical perspective.

COMM 3543 Film Analysis

 Introduction to film analysis designed to help students develop a visual literacy with regard to film and a critical understanding of how films produce meanings. Focus is on formal analysis of film including elements such as narrative, mise-en-scene, editing, camera movement, and sound and on key critical and theoretical approaches such as neoformalism, socio-historicism, and psychoanalysis. Classical131
Hollywood cinema and avant-garde and independent film making traditions are studied in order to focus on the “politics of form.” A required film journal helps students develop analytical and critical skills.

COMM 4523 Writing for Television

Basic dramatic sreenwriting techniques for television and film. Disciplines of plot construction, characterization and dialogue as well as various technical elements are examined.

COMM 4553 Filmmaking

 The purpose of this course is to introduce students to industry standards of filmmaking. A solid foundation in the core concepts and principles of filmmaking will be stressed. Focusing on the importance of organization and experimentation within the filmmaking process will allow students to expand their creativity while giving them a solid foundation and a working knowledge of project management. This curriculum encompasses film studies through the pre-production to post-production process including writing, directing, shooting, editing, and hands-on exercises geared towards industry production standards.

COMM 4959 Special Topics

 An in-depth study in a specialized area.

COMM 4969 Special Topics

An in-depth study in a specialized area.